Sunday, January 22, 2017

15 Paintings, PORTRAIT OF A LADY, by Konstantin Korovin, with Footnotes. # 10

Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Muse. 1887
Oil on canvas
The State Tretyakov Gallery

Konstantin Alekseyevich Korovin (5 December  1861 – 11 September 1939) was a leading Russian Impressionist painter.

Konstantin was born in Moscow to a merchant family officially registered as "peasants of Vladimir Gubernia". His father, Aleksey Mikhailovich Korovin, earned a university degree and was more interested in arts and music than in the family business established by Konstantin's grandfather. Konstantin's older brother Sergei Korovin was a notable realist painter. Konstantin's relative Illarion Pryanishnikov was also a prominent painter of the time and a teacher at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.

In 1875 Korovin entered the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, where he studied with Vasily Perov and Alexei Savrasov. His brother Sergei was already a student at the school. During their student years, the Korovins became friends with fellow students Valentin Serov and Isaac Levitan; Konstantin maintained these friendships throughout his life.


Konstantin Korovin (1861–1939)
Portrait SN Galitzine. 1886
Oil on canvas
Collection of the State Tretyakov Gallery

In 1881–1882, Korovin spent a year at the Imperial Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg, but returned disappointed to the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. He studied at the school under his new teacher Vasily Polenov until 1886.


Konstantin Korovin (1861–1939)
"Paris Cafe" (second half 1890)
Oil on canvas

The paintings, inspired by Paris, shows Korovin's strong impressionism. A cozy corners Parisian café with vistas of the boulevard. The subtlest tonal gradations of light transmits the smallest details of the effects of: humidity, light fog, light halos sunlight, condensation and rarefied atmosphere. The picture is full of the cheer and happiness, that distinguishes most of the artist's paintings.

Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Spaniard. 1894
Oil on canvas
58 x 33 cm



In 1885 Korovin traveled to Paris and Spain. "Paris was a shock for me … Impressionists… in them I found everything I was scolded for back home in Moscow", he later wrote.


Konstantin Korovin (1861–1939)
"In the balcony. Leonora and Ampara Spanish flu" (1888-1889)
Oil on canvas
Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia

The painting was begun in 1888 in Valencia, during a trip to Spain, and finished in 1889 in Moscow. To thank the girls posing, Ampara and Leonora, the artist presented them with their favorite shoes and shawls of Chinese silk. In 1889, Korovin made his debut with the "Spanish flu" in the exhibition of the Wanderers, and in 1900 won the gold medal in the framework of the Russian exposition at the World Exhibition in Paris. This contributed to his European and world-famous renown. "Spanish flu" was important because color was an evident attitude for the painter, "warming" tone. Light, moving impressionistic brushstrokes are combined with decorative Art Nouveau. More

In 1888 Korovin traveled with Mamontov to Italy and Spain, where he produced the painting On the Balcony, Spanish Women Leonora and Ampara (above). Konstantin traveled within Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia and exhibited with the Peredvizhniki. He painted in the Impressionist, and later in the Art Nouveau, styles.

In the 1890s Korovin became a member of the Mir iskusstva art group.


Konstantin Korovin (1861–1939)
"Northern Idyll" (1892)
Oil on canvas
State Tretyakov Gallery

The idea for this ​​painting came to Korovin while working on a design for the opera "The Snow Maiden" based on the play by Alexander Ostrovsky. At the time the artist was working in the theater and often turned to the subject of folklore. In the picture are clearly visible innovative techniques Korovin in theatrical decorative art. Strong contrast of bright, saturated colors of the national costumes, combined with dark tones vechereyuschego sky, eclectic detailed landscape images and generalized patches of color figures. This was new to the theater. The painting reflects the poetic relationship between man and nature, it carries the Russian national coloring.


Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Study for the painting "Northern Idyll." 1886
Oil on canvas
The State Russian Museum

Korovin's subsequent works were strongly influenced by his travels to the north. In 1888 he was captivated by the stern northern landscapes seen in The Coast of Norway and the Northern Sea.


Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Portrait ON Alyab'evoy. 1889
Oil on canvas
The State Tretyakov Gallery

His second trip to the north, with Valentin Serov in 1894, coincided with the construction of the Northern Railway. Korovin painted a large number of landscapes: Norwegian Port, St. Triphon's Brook in Pechenga, Hammerfest: Aurora Borealis, The Coast at Murmansk and others. The paintings are built on a delicate web of shades of grey. The etude style of these works was typical for Korovin's art of the 1890s.


orovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Paper lanterns, c. 1898
Oil on canvas
37.5 x 51.5 cm
Chuvash State Art Museum


In 1900 Korovin designed the Central Asia section of the Russian Empire pavilion at the Paris World Fair and was awarded the Legion of Honour by the French government.


Konstantin Korovin (1861-1939)
Creek, c. 1902
Oil on canvas
Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia

In the beginning of the 20th century, Korovin focused his attention on the theater. He moved from Mamontov's opera to the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg. Departing from traditional stage decor, which only indicated the place of action, Korovin produced a mood decor conveying the general emotions of the performance. Korovin designed sets for Konstantin Stanislavsky's dramatic productions, as well as Mariinsky's operas and ballets. He did the stage design for such Mariinsky productions as Faust (1899), The Little Humpbacked Horse (1901), and Sadko (1906) that became famous for their expressiveness.


Konstantin Korovin (1861-1939)
Près de la Fenêtre
Oil on canvas

In 1905 Korovin became an Academician of Painting and in 1909–1913 a professor at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.

One of the artist's favourite themes was Paris. He painted A Paris Cafe (1890s), Cafe de la Paix (1905), La Place de la Bastille (1906), Paris at Night, Le Boulevard Italien (1908), Night Carnival (1901), Paris in the Evening (1907), and others.


Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Nadezhda Komarovskaya, c. 1910
Oil on canvas

During World War I Korovin worked as a camouflage consultant at the headquarters of one of the Russian armies and was often seen on the front lines. After the October Revolution Korovin continued to work in the theater, designing stages for Richard Wagner's Die Walküre and Siegfried, as well as Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's The Nutcracker (1918–1920).


Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
In A Room, c.  1919
Oil on canvas
Voronezh Regional Museum of Fine Arts (Kramskoi Museum), Voronezh, Russia

Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Portrait Of A Woman, c. 1912
Oil on canvas
National Gallery of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia

In 1923 Korovin moved to Paris on the advice of Commissar of Education Anatoly Lunacharsky to cure his heart condition and help his handicapped son. There was supposed to be a large exhibition of Korovin's works, but the works were stolen and Korovin was left penniless. For years, he produced the numerous Russian Winters and Paris Boulevards just to make ends meet.


Korovin Konstantin [1861-1939]
Woman With Guitar, c. 1919
Oil on canvas
Apartment Museum of Joseph Brodsky, Saint Petersburg, Russia

In the last years of his life he produced stage designs for many of the major theatres of Europe, America, Asia and Australia, the most famous of which is his scenery for the Turin Opera House's production of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's The Golden Cockerel.


Korovin died in Paris on 11 September 1939.





Acknowledgement: WikipediaEvening Moscow

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others

Friday, January 20, 2017

12 Classic Marine Paintings - With Footnotes, #22

Montague Dawson
Frigate Cutting Through Choppy Seas
16 7/8 x 26 5/8 in
Watercolor on paper
Private Collection

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Montague was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (1811–1878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (1841–1917), who considerably influenced his work. In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine.

After the War, Dawson established himself as a professional marine artist, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep-water sailing ships. During the Second World War, he was employed as a war artist. Dawson exhibited regularly at the Royal Society of Marine Artists, of which he became a member, from 1946 to 1964, and occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936. By the 1930s he was considered one of the greatest living marine artists, whose patrons included two American Presidents, Dwight D Eisenhower and Lyndon B Johnson, as well as the British Royal Family. Also in the 1930s, he moved to Milford-Upon-Sea in Hampshire, living there for many years. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings which often sell for six figures.

The work of Montague Dawson is represented in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich and the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth. More

Edward William Cooke
French Sloop Entering the Harbour of Tréport, c. 1869
Oil on canvas
81.3 x 134.6 cm
Private Collection

Le Tréport is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Haute-Normandie region in north-eastern France. A small fishing port and light industrial town situated in the Pays de Caux, some 21 miles (34 km) northeast of Dieppe. The mouth of the Bresle river meets the English Channel here, in between the high (110 metres) chalk cliffs and the pebbly beach. More Le Tréport

Edward William Cooke, R.A., F.R.S., F.Z.S., F.S.A., F.G.S. (27 March 1811 – 4 January 1880) was an English landscape and marine painter, and gardener. Cooke was born in Pentonville, London, the son of well-known line engraver George Cooke; his uncle, William Bernard Cooke (1778–1855), was also a line engraver of note, and Edward was raised in the company of artists. He was a precocious draughtsman and a skilled engraver from an early age, displayed an equal preference for marine subjects (in special in sailing ships) and published his "Shipping and Craft" – a series of accomplished engravings – when he was 18, in 1829. He benefited from the advice of many of his father’s associates, notably Clarkson Stanfield and David Roberts. Cooke began painting in oils in 1833, took formal lessons from James Stark in 1834 and first exhibited at the Royal Academy and British Institution in 1835, by which time his style was essentially formed.

He went on to travel and paint with great industry at home and abroad, indulging his love of the 17th-century Dutch marine artists with a visit to the Netherlands in 1837. He returned regularly over the next 23 years, studying the effects of the coastal landscape and light, as well as the works of the country's Old Masters, resulting in highly successful paintings. He went on to travel in Scandinavia, Spain, North Africa and, above all, to Venice. In 1858, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Honorary Academician.

Cooke also had serious natural history and geological interests, being a Fellow of the Linnean Society, Fellow of the Geological Society and Fellow of the Zoological Society, and of the Society of Antiquaries. His geological interests in particular led to his election as Fellow of the Royal Society in 1863 and he became a Royal Academician the following year.

In 1842 John Edward Gray named a species of boa, Corallus cookii, in Cooke's honor. More

Thomas Bush Hardy
Fishing smacks off Boulogne, c. 1892
13.5 x 21in
Watercolour

Private Collection

A smack was a traditional fishing boat used off the coast of Britain and the Atlantic coast of America for most of the 19th century. In England the sails were white cotton until a proofing coat was applied, usually after the sail was a few years old. This gave the sails its distinctive red ochre colour, which made them a picturesque sight in large numbers. More about smacks

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842, Sheffield – 1897, Maida Vale, London) was a British marine painter and watercolourist. As a young man he travelled in the Netherlands and Italy. In 1884 Hardy was elected a Member of the Royal Society of British Artists. He exhibited with the Society and also at the Royal Academy.
His paintings feature coastal scenes in England and the Netherlands, the French Channel ports and the Venetian Lagoon.

Hardy had nine children. His son Dudley Hardy was a painter, illustrator and poster designer. His daughter Dorothy received an MBE after working as a nurse in the First World War. He died on 15 December 1897 in Maida Vale, London. More

Thomas Bush Hardy
La Cote à Wimereux; Fishing boats at sea, c. 1897
12 x 26 in
Oils on board
Private Collection


Wimereux is a coastal town situated some 5 kilometres (3 mi) north of Boulogne, on the banks of the river Wimereux. The river Slack forms the northern boundary of the commune, the English Channel the western. Farming and tourism are its principal activities. More Wimereux

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842, Sheffield – 1897, Maida Vale, London) see above


Thomas Bush Hardy
Unloading the Day's Catch, c. 1893
Watercolour with scratching out
22.3 x 68 cm
Private Collection

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842, Sheffield – 1897, Maida Vale, London) see above

Montague Dawson
THE COLD WHITE BARQUE
24 1/8 by 35 7/8 in.; 61.2 by 91 cm
Oil on canvas
Private Collection


In Ancient Egypt barques were a type of boat used from Egypt's earliest recorded times and are depicted in many drawings, paintings, and reliefs that document the culture. Transportation to the afterlife was believed to be accomplished by way of barques as well, and the image is used in many of the religious murals and carvings in temples and tombs. Many models of these boats, that range from tiny to huge in size, have been found.

A barque became is a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts. In the 18th century, the British Royal Navy used the term bark for a nondescript vessel that did not fit any of its usual categories. More barque

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) see above


Montague Dawson
THE COLD WHITE BARQUE
Detail

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) see above

Montague Dawson
The British clipper ship Thermopylae
Watercolor and gouache on paper
16-1/4 x 26 in. (41.2 x 66 cm.)
Private Collection


Thermopylae was an extreme composite clipper ship built in 1868 by Walter Hood & Co of Aberdeen, to the design of Bernard Waymouth of London, for the China tea trade, and set speed records on her maiden voyage to Melbourne—63 days,  In 1872, Thermopylae raced the clipper Cutty Sark from Shanghai back to London. Thermopylae won by seven days after Cutty Sark lost her rudder. From 1882 onward, Thermopylae took part in the Australian wool trade; however, on this route Cutty Sark proved faster.

In 1897 she was sold to Portugal for use as a naval training ship and renamed Pedro Nunes. On 13 October 1907, the Portuguese Navy towed her down the Tagus river using two warships, and before Amelia de Orleans, Queen of Portugal, she was torpedoed with full naval honours off Cascais. More Thermopylae

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) see above


Montague Dawson
The British clipper ship Thermopylae
Detail

Montague Dawson
Far Away - The Black Adder
Oil on canvas
24 x 36 in.(60.9 x 91.4 cm.)
Private Collection


Blackadder was a clipper ship used for fast sailing of cargo.

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) see above


Montague Dawson
Far Away - The Black Adder
Detail

FREDERICK McCUBBIN, 1855 - 1917
AT COLOMBO, c. 1907
Oil on artist's board
24 by 34 cm
Private Collection

Frederick McCubbin visited Colombo, in Ceylon or present day Sri Lanka, en route to Europe in 1907. This was his long awaited, first and only overseas journey. He sailed from Melbourne aboard the Prince Heinrich on 21 May. More

Frederick McCubbin (25 February 1855 – 20 December 1917) was an Australian painter and prominent member of the Heidelberg School art movement, also known as Australian Impressionism. McCubbin was born in Melbourne, and later worked for a time as solicitor's clerk, a coach painter and in his family's bakery business while studying art at the National Gallery of Victoria's School of Design,

By the early 1880s, McCubbin's work began to attract considerable attention and won a number of prizes from the National Gallery, including a first prize in 1883. By the mid-1880s he concentrated more on painting the Australian bush, the works for which he became notable.

In 1888, he became instructor and master of the School of Design at the National Gallery. In this position he taught a number of students who themselves became prominent Australian artists, including Charles Conder and Arthur Streeton.

FREDERICK McCUBBIN, 1855 - 1917
View of Naples , c. 1908
Oil on artist's board
33.5 x 49.5 cm
Private Collection

McCubbin married in March 1889. In 1901 McCubbin and his family moved to Mount Macedon. It was in this beautiful setting, in 1904, that he painted The Pioneer, amongst many other works, and this is the only place that McCubbin ever painted fairiest. It was at Macedon that he was inspired by the surrounding bush to experiment with the light and its effects on colour in nature.

McCubbin continued to paint through the first two decades of the 20th century, though by the beginning of World War I his health began to fail. He traveled to England in 1907 and visited Tasmania, but aside from these relatively short excursions lived most of his life in Melbourne. There he taught at the National Gallery of Victoria Art School. In 1912 he became the founding member of the Australian Art Association. More McCubbin

FREDERICK McCUBBIN, 1855 - 1917
Shipping on the Yarra
Oil on canvas
24 x 34 cm
Private Collection

The Yarra River was a major food source and meeting place for indigenous Australians from prehistoric times. Shortly after the arrival of European settlers land clearing forced the remaining Wurundjeri to neighbouring territories and away from the river. 

The river was utilised primarily for agriculture by early European settlers. The landscape of the river has changed dramatically since 1835. The course has been progressively disrupted and the river widened in places. Today, the mouth and including Swanson and Appleton Docks are used for container shipping by the Port of Melbourne which is the busiest on the continent. The city reach which is inaccessible to larger watercraft, has seen increased use for both transport and recreational boating. More Yarra River

Elie Anatole Pavil, 1873-1948 (Ukrainian, French) 
Port landscape 
Oil on canvas 
27 w: 35 cm
Private Collection

Elie Anatole Pavil, 1873-1948 (Ukrainian, French)  studied at the Julian Academy under Bouguereau in Paris. He was friends with Pissarro, Renoir, Sisley and Monet who admired his works during the expositions. He exhibited at the Salon des Artistes, at the Salon of Independent Artists, and at L’Automne. He won many awards and medals for his works. He also received the ‘Legion d’Honneur’ His works are found in many great collections around the world. The Museum of Modern Art, Paris and the ‘Petit Palais’ have many of his works. More Pavil

Robert Antoine Pinchon, 1886-1943 (French) 
Bridge over the river 
Oil on canvas 
88 w: 116 cm

Robert Antoine Pinchon (July 1, 1886 in Rouen – January 9, 1943 in Bois-Guillaume) was a French Post-Impressionist landscape painter of the Rouen School (l'École de Rouen) who was born and spent most of his life in France. He was consistent throughout his career in his dedication to painting landscapes en plein air (i.e., outdoors). From the age of nineteen (1905 to 1907) he worked in a Fauve style but never deviated into Cubism, and, unlike others, never found that Post-Impressionism did not fulfill his artistic needs. Claude Monet referred to him as "a surprising touch in the service of a surprising eye".

Among his important works are a series of paintings of the River Seine, mostly around Rouen, and landscapes depicting places in or near Upper Normandy. More Pinchon





Acknowledgement: Invaluable

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others





Thursday, January 19, 2017

15 Paintings, Streets of Paris, by its Artists from 1850-1910 - Part 7 - With Footnotes

Pierre-Pierre-Auguste Renoir, (1841–1919)
Patineurs au bois de
Boulogne/Skaters in the Bois de Boulogne, c. 1868
Oil on canvas
72 × 90 cm (28.3 × 35.4 in)
Private collection
       
Skaters in the Bois de Boulogne is an oil-on-canvas landscape painting by the French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir, created during the winter of 1868. The painting depicts a snowscape with a large number of Parisians, young and old, spending leisure time on a frozen park lake. Due to Renoir's strong dislike of cold temperatures and snow, the piece is one of his few winter landscapes. More

The Bois de Boulogne is a large public park located along the western edge of the 16th arrondissement of Paris. It was created between 1852 and 1858 during the reign of the Emperor Louis Napoleon.

It covers an area of 845 hectares (2090 acres),[2] which is about two and a half times the area of Central Park in New York and slightly less (88%) than that of Richmond Park in London.

Within the boundaries of the Bois de Boulogne are an English landscape garden with several lakes and a cascade; two smaller botanical and landscape gardens, the Château de Bagatelle and the Pré-Catelan; a zoo and amusement park in the Jardin d'Acclimatation; The Jardin des Serres d'Auteuil, a complex of greenhouses holding a hundred thousand plants; two tracks for horse racing, the Hippodrome de Longchamp and the Auteuil Hippodrome; a tennis stadium where the French Open tennis tournament is held each year; and other attractions. More Bois de Boulogne

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, commonly known as Auguste Renoir (25 February 1841 – 3 December 1919), was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty, and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that "Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau."

He was the father of actor Pierre Renoir (1885–1952), filmmaker Jean Renoir (1894–1979) and ceramic artist Claude Renoir (1901–69). He was the grandfather of the filmmaker Claude Renoir (1913–1993), son of Pierre. More

Victor Guerrier, (1893-1968)
Paris - The Metro, c.1920
Canvas, Oil Paint
29 in.Hx39.5 in.W
Flackwell Heath, GB

A large oil on canvas depicting an image of the hustle and bustle of figures arriving and leaving the metro in Paris. 

The first line opened without ceremony on 19 July 1900, during the World's Fair (Exposition Universelle). The system expanded quickly until the First World War and the core was complete by the 1920s. Extensions into suburbs and Line 11 were built in the 1930s. The network reached saturation after World War II with new trains to allow higher traffic, but further improvements have been limited by the design of the network and in particular the short distances between stations. More Paris Metro

Victor Guerrier (1893-1968) was born and trained in Lyon living much of his life at Saint Cyr au Mont d’Or. He began his career as an illustrator but made his name painting Belle Epoque subjects and Parisian life between the wars. 

Clearly inspired by the work of Impressionist masters such Manet and Toulouse-Lautrec his work captures and celebrates the diversity of life in Paris at the turn of the century; from the nightclubs of Montmartre to the cafés of the Champ-Elysses, Guerrier depicts French high society in its pomp. There is often a subtle narrative to the work, where a stolen glance speaks volumes. Further evidence of Manet’s work is evident in his figures, who often stare directly at the viewer, creating images that are, at once, engaging and arresting, while the fashions of the age are beautifully rendered with a vivid palette and deftly applied impasto. 

Guerrier also worked in the Alps and Algeria producing a number of Orientalist subjects along with a series of paintings in St Paul de Vence. He exhibited at the Salon de Printemps. More Guerrier

Victor Guerrier, 1893-1968 (French)
Woman in cafe
oil on canvas
100 x 73 cm (39 x 28 in.) 

Victor Guerrier, 1893-1968 (French), see above

Maurice Utrillo, 1883 - 1955
SACRÉ-COEUR DE MONTMARTRE ET SQUARE ST. PIERRE, c. 1933
Gouache on paper
12 7/8 by 18 7/8 in., 32.8 by 48 cm
Private Collection

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris is a Roman Catholic church and minor basilica, dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. The basilica is located at the summit of the butte Montmartre, the highest point in the city. Sacré-Cœur is a double monument, political and cultural, both a national penance for the defeat of France in the 1871 Franco-Prussian War and the socialist Paris Commune of 1871 crowning its most rebellious neighborhood, and an embodiment of conservative moral order

The Sacré-Cœur Basilica was designed by Paul Abadie. Construction began in 1875 and was finished in 1914. It was consecrated after the end of World War I in 1919. More Basilica

Maurice Utrillo (26 December 1883 – 5 November 1955), was a French painter who specialized in cityscapes. Born in the Montmartre quarter of Paris, France, Utrillo is one of the few famous painters of Montmartre who was born there.

Utrillo was the son of the artist Suzanne Valadon (born Marie-Clémentine Valadon), who was then an eighteen-year-old artist's model. She never revealed who was the father of her child; speculation exists that he was the offspring from a liaison with an equally young amateur painter.

When a mental illness took hold of the 21-year-old Utrillo in 1904, his mother encouraged him to take up painting. He soon showed real artistic talent. With no training beyond what his mother taught him, he drew and painted what he saw in Montmartre. After 1910 his work attracted critical attention, and by 1920 he was internationally acclaimed. In 1928, the French government awarded him the Cross of the Légion d'honneur. Throughout his life, however, he was interned in mental asylums repeatedly. More Maurice Utrillo

Victor Guerrier, 1893-1968 (French) 
Woman with fur sleeve at Place de la République 
Oil on canvas 
100 w: 81 cm

The Place de la République is a square in Paris, located on the border between the 3rd, 10th and 11th arrondissements. It is named after the French Republic and was called the Place du Château-d'Eau until 1879. The Métro station of République lies beneath the square.

The square was originally called the Place du Château d'Eau, named after a huge fountain designed by Pierre-Simon Girard and built on the site in 1811. Émile de La Bédollière wrote that the water came from la Villette and that the fountain was "superb" in character. In 1867, Gabriel Davioud built a more impressive fountain in the square, which (like the first fountain) was decorated with lions. The square took its current shape as part of Baron Hausmann's vast renovation of Paris. More The Place de la République

Victor Guerrier, 1893-1968 (French), see above

Maurice Utrillo, 1883 - 1955
MONTMARTRE AVEC VUE DE SACRÉ-COEUR, circa 1950
Pastel and gouache heightened with oil on paper
15 by 11 1/4 in., 38 by 31 cm
Private Collection

Maurice Utrillo (26 December 1883 – 5 November 1955), see above

Pierre-Eugène Montézin, 1874-1946
RUE SOUS LA PLUIE
Oil on canvas
21 1/2 by 21 1/2 in., 54.5 by 54.5 cm
Private Collection

Pierre Eugene Montézin (1874 - 1946) had a long and distinguished career as a landscape painter working in the style and according to the theories and principles, of the 
Impressionists. Montézin was born in Paris, 16 October 1874, his father being a designer of lace who apprenticed his son to the workshop of a decorator specialising in murals. However, Montézin also studied under the painter Ernest Quost (1844-1931) and it was Quost together with Montézin’s interest in the Impressionists that persuaded him to embark on a career as a painter. 

Montézin first exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1903 and continued to do so, being awarded a third class medal in 1907 and a second class medal in 1910. Montézin enlisted in 1914 and served throughout the Great War. On his return to painting he spent a year at Dreux and at Moret, painting landscapes of the region. In 1920 he was awarded the Rosa Bonheur prize at the Salon but exhibited more frequently at the Salon des Artistes Française. Here he was 
awarded the medal of honour and subsequently elected to the Jury Committee of the Artistes Française and also elected a member of the Academie des Beaux-Arts. In 1923 he was made Chevalier d’Honneur. More

Jules Hervé, 1887 - 1981
PARIS, LE JARDIN DES TUILERIES
Oil on canvas
32 by 40 in., 81.3 by 101.6 cm
Private Collection

The Tuileries Garden (Jardin des Tuileries) is a public garden located between the Louvre Museum and the Place de la Concorde in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. Created by Catherine de Medici as the garden of the Tuileries Palace in 1564, it was eventually opened to the public in 1667, and became a public park after the French Revolution. In the 19th and 20th century, it was the place where Parisians celebrated, met, promenaded, and relaxed. More

Jules René Hervé, France (1887-1981) was born in 1887 in Langres,  in Eastern France. Hervé began his formal art studies in an evening school in Langres, France.  He traveled to Paris to continue his studies at the School of Decorative Arts, and later at the Fine Arts School. Herve exhibited paintings at the Salon of French Artists in 1910.  In 1914 he received the Silver Medal from the Association of French Artists.  Soon after, he volunteered to join the army during World War I.  From 1911 to 1943, he taught painting to many generations of young artists.

Jules René Hervé represents the purest tradition of French art. His paintings display a marvelous harmony of color and light. While his paintings are reminiscent of the earlier impressionist movement, Herve uses short brushstrokes to render his paintings focusing on the interplay of light and color.

Paintings by Hervé may be found in numerous museums in France; in the Petite Palais in Pads, at Langres, Troues Dijon, Saint-Etienne, Tourcoing, and Annecy. His work is also displayed abroad in the Chicago Museum and in Casablanca and in private international collections.

Named after an engineer-entrepreneur Mary Christophe Marie, the bridge itself was constructed from 1614 until 1635. One of the oldest bridges in Paris, Pont Marie is near Notre Dame. More Jules René Hervé

Victor Guerrier, 1893-1968 (French) 
Woman with umbrella, The Place de la Concorde 
Oil on canvas 
60 w: 73 cm

The Place de la Concorde is one of the major public squares in Paris. Iit is the largest square in the French capital and is located in the city's eighth arrondissement, at the eastern end of the Champs-Élysées.

The place was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel in 1755 as a moat-skirted octagon between the Champs-Élysées to the west and the Tuileries Garden to the east. Decorated with statues and fountains, the area was named Place Louis XV to honor the king at that time.

During the French Revolution the statue of Louis XV of France was torn down and the area renamed Place de la Révolution. The new revolutionary government erected the guillotine in the square, and it was here that King Louis XVI was executed on 21 January 1793.

In 1795, under the Directory, the square was renamed Place de la Concorde as a gesture of reconciliation after the turmoil of the French Revolution. After the Bourbon Restoration of 1814, the name was changed back to Place Louis XV, and in 1826 the square was renamed Place Louis XVI. After the July Revolution of 1830 the name was returned to Place de la Concorde and has remained that way since. More The Place de la Concorde

Victor Guerrier, 1893-1968 (French), see above

Jean Dufy, 1888 - 1964
PARIS, LE CARROUSEL DU LOUVRE
Watercolor and gouache on paper mounted on card
17 5/8 by 23 3/4 in., 44.8 by 60.3 cm
Private Collection

The Carrousel du Louvre is a mall in Paris, France. The name refers to two nearby sites, the Louvre museum and the Place du Carrousel.

Jean Dufy (b Le Havre, France, 1888; d La Boissière, 1964) French Painter. Following his service in the military, from 1910-1912, Jean Dufy relocated to Paris. Inspired by the work of Braque and Picasso, Dufy created watercolors that expressed a heightened understanding of color and light. In the mid-1920s, Jean Dufy became captivated by the music of the time, such as Darius Millaud and Francis Poulenc, and incorporated this interest into his artwork. While depicting orchestral and musical subjects, Dufy later became enchanted by the coast of Northern France and began to create majestic and effecting landscapes. Throughout the 1950s Dufy explored Western Europe and North America, but inevitably returned to his watercolors and oils of Paris. Just two months after the death of his wife, Ismérie, Jean Dufy died in 1964 in La BoissiereMore


Konstantin Korovin (1861-1939)
Paris.Cafe de la Paix, c. 1906
Oil on canvas
Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia

The Café de la Paix is a famous café designed by Alfred Armand, who also designed the InterContinental Paris Le Grand Hotel in which the café is located, the florid interior decor is only exceeded by that of Charles Garnier's Opéra (located across the plaza).  More Café de la Paix 

Konstantin Alekseyevich Korovin (1861 – 1939) was a leading Russian Impressionist painter. Konstantin was born in Moscow. His father, Aleksey Mikhailovich Korovin, earned a university degree and was more interested in arts and music than in the family business. In 1875 Korovin entered the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.

In 1885 he then traveled to Paris and Spain. "Paris was a shock for me … Impressionists… in them I found everything I was scolded for back home in Moscow", he later wrote. In 1888 he traveled to Italy and Spain. He painted in the Impressionist, and later in the Art Nouveau, styles.

Korovin's subsequent works were strongly influenced by his travels to the north. Korovin painted a large number of landscapes. The paintings are built on a delicate web of shades of grey. The etude style of these works was typical for Korovin's art of the 1890s. Using material from his trip, Korovin designed the Far North pavilion at the 1896 All Russia Exhibition in Nizhny Novgorod. He painted ten big canvasses for the pavilion as well, depicting various aspects of life in the northern and Arctic regions. 

In 1900 Korovin designed the Central Asia section of the Russian Empire pavilion at the Paris World Fair and was awarded the Legion of Honour by the French government.

In the beginning of the 20th century, Korovin focused his attention on the theater. In 1905 Korovin became an Academician of Painting and in 1909–1913 a professor at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.

During World War I Korovin worked as a camouflage consultant at the headquarters of one of the Russian armies. In 1923 he moved to Paris to cure his heart condition and help his handicapped son. There was supposed to be a large exhibition of Korovin's works, but the works were stolen and Korovin was left penniless. For years, he produced the numerous Russian Winters and Paris Boulevards just to make ends meet.

In the last years of his life he produced stage designs for many of the major theatres of Europe, America, Asia and Australia, the most famous of which is his scenery for the Turin Opera House's production of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's The Golden Cockerel.

Korovin died in Paris on 11 September 1939. More

Konstantin Korovin (1861-1939)
Paris. boulevard Kapucinok, Date: 1906
Boulevard des Capucines
Oil on canvas
Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia

The Boulevard des Capucines is one of the four 'grands boulevards' in Paris, a chain of boulevards running east-west that also includes Boulevard de la Madeleine, Boulevard des Italiens, and Boulevard Montmartre.

The name comes from a beautiful convent of Capuchin nuns whose garden was on the south side of the boulevard prior to the French Revolution.

The former name, Rue Basse-du-Rempart, suggests that, in the beginning, the street paralleled the city wall of Paris. Then, when the wall was destroyed, the street was widened and became a boulevard. More Boulevard des Capucines

Konstantin Korovin (1861-1939), see above

Konstantin Korovin (1861-1939)
A Parisian Balcony, c. 1908
Oil on canvas
Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia

Konstantin Korovin (1861-1939), see above

Pierre Bonnard, 1867 - 1894
People on the street, c. 1894 
Oil on canvas
24 × 25 cm
Private Collection

Pierre Bonnard (3 October 1867 — 23 January 1947) was a French painter and printmaker, as well as a founding member of the Post-Impressionist group of avant-garde painters Les Nabis. Bonnard preferred to work from memory, using drawings as a reference, and his paintings are often characterized by a dreamlike quality. The intimate domestic scenes, for which he is perhaps best known, often include his wife Marthe de Meligny.

Bonnard has been described as "the most thoroughly idiosyncratic of all the great twentieth- century painters", and the unusual vantage points of his compositions rely less on traditional modes of pictorial structure than voluptuous color, poetic allusions and visual wit. Identified as a late practitioner of Impressionism in the early 20th century, Bonnard has since been recognized for his unique use of color and his complex imagery. More

Pierre Bonnard, 1867 - 1894
Street In Eragny-Sur-Oise Or Dogs In Eragny
Oil on wood
37 cm (14.57 in.), Width: 27 cm (10.63 in.)
National Gallery of Art - Washington DC  (United States - Washington)

Éragny (sometimes unofficially called Éragny-sur-Oise) is a commune in the northwestern suburbs of Paris. It is located 26.3 km (16.3 mi) from the center of Paris, in the "new town" of Cergy-Pontoise. More Eragny

Pierre Bonnard (3 October 1867 — 23 January 1947) see above


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